11- Just a little more about poverty: From what I can remember

This is my eleventh in the series, recalling events in my life from early childhood to wherever I decide to stop writing. I’ve touched on the fact that I was born into and brought up in poverty. Since reminiscing about ones past, tends to have an almost built-in romantic quality to it, I want to dedicate a few words to the more realistic elements of my less than materially blessed upbringing.

The lack of indoor running water, outdoor toilets, less than adequate home insulation to keep the cold of winter outside, bathing in a number 10 oval tub are just a few of the many inconveniences I recall being par for the course living in rural Cross County, Arkansas. These things might be roughing it to some middle-class, suburbanite today (which is what I am), but back in the 1950s and all the 1960s was how my family and I lived.

When I was a small boy, up until around ten-years-old or so, I never really thought that much about being poor, living without few material possessions. When we moved into the house my mom had relocated close to the gravel road, something happened that opened my eyes to just how poor we were. Although we still didn’t have indoor plumbing, we did have electricity and a television. The quality of the pictures was often snow-storm low definition, but Ed Sullivan, Captain Kangaroo, and a host of good old American shows, which had no cultural significance to me, became a powerful misrepresentative image of what America looked like. Looking at these examples of people dressed to the nines and living in homes that might as well had been the Taj Mahal to me, sounded a troubling alarm, “You are poor!” My mother getting us new clothes for school once a year, made possible by putting them in lay-away just didn’t cut it anymore. The Sears-Roebuck catalog was our Aladdin’s lamp, holding the answer to countless wishes for toys, clothing and a menagerie of things that could certainly rescue me from the wretchedness of poverty. Unfortunately, it didn’t matter how many times we might have rubbed the cover, what we desired didn’t mysteriously appear. Instead, basics like clothing and household necessities were the only things that were delivered by the postman or picked up by my mother at catalog store in town.

There are experiences I had as a country kid that I’ve chosen to not write about. You see, the three school buses that transported kids from around the county to Wynne to attend school delivered victims of taunts to their destination of shame daily. The town kids felt that they were somehow better than us. And they made their best effort to choose the most cutting and demeaning adjectives to describe our existence on earth. In retrospect, they were no better than we were; their lot was influenced by the restrictions of racism and discrimination in the same manner as we country bumpkins. Of course, I now find it hard to see how living in a village of four to five thousand denizens, in a rural state would spare them from being categorized as anything but country? Enough. I said I wouldn’t write about this.

I remember seeing images of white guys on television wearing suits and carrying briefcases. They looked quite dapper, and they lacked the collection of dirt and grime about their being I saw on my uncles after they had been laboring hard on C.T. Gibbs’ farm for wages that only lasted from one pay day to the next. (I do want to make it very clear that my uncles and all the poor Black men who did this sort of labor were hard workers, without formal education, doing what was necessary to provide for their families.) I don’t remember any of them ever being unemployed. I told myself in a voice that still rings loudly, even today, that I wanted to be like one of those white guys, going to work in a suit and carrying briefcase. I’m not sure I’ll write more about that point, but I did end up being the first grandchild of grandpa and Sweet’s to attend college, and yes, I did wear suits and carry briefcases to work. My career took me to the point of retirement from the position of associate vice chancellor/chief human resources officer for the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in 2013.

I’m old and blessed…hope you will be too.

5 thoughts on “11- Just a little more about poverty: From what I can remember

  1. catterel October 22, 2020 / 8:36 pm

    It sounds very harsch, but I’m sure the bruises and wounds received in your youth helped to make you the person you are, and without those experiences you would be a lesser man. Be blessed!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pam Leidermann October 24, 2020 / 12:07 pm

    Hosea, just saw your story on multiple myeloma on the UAMS and wanted to reach out to you. I always enjoyed working with you and your team. (I managed creative services and worked for Dr. Reece.) I smile when I read letter to the editor in the Dem Gaz and always agree with you! I am sure you are a hero to so many. Now I’m going to catch up with your blog.
    Here’s wishing you continued good health.

    Pam Leidermann

    Like

    • oldandblessed October 24, 2020 / 1:10 pm

      Thanks so much for taking the time to reach out to me! Thanks too for the wishes of continued good health. I wish you the best life has to offer. Godspeed!

      Like

  3. Valeri Massing November 18, 2020 / 10:05 pm

    Do you mind if I quote a couple of your articles as long as I provide credit and sources back to your weblog? My blog site is in the exact same niche as yours and my users would truly benefit from some of the information you provide here. Please let me know if this ok with you. Regards!

    Like

    • oldandblessed November 19, 2020 / 3:20 pm

      Please feel free. I would also feel comfortable with reblogging. Thanks.

      Like

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