Your story is important

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Photo by Lum3n.com on Pexels.com

In our times, blogs are being written, books are being published, talk shows are being produced in what seems to be enumerable measure. Most, if not all, of these public presentations are touting aspects of someone’s story. Have you ever thought about why someone’s story is worthy of publication, and another person investing time to soak it in? It would seem obvious; however, I don’t think most of us give much thought to the fact that that’s one of the most valuable commodities we have, our stories. Have you ever found yourself mesmerized as you listen to someone share details of some dramatic moment in their life?

There was a time, before our digitized age, when people sat around some point of reference: a fireplace, the city gate, the dinner table to share stories. Stories carried valuable information. They gave people a sense of belonging to something much larger than themselves. They connected people with the past, the present and gave some indication of what their legacy would be for future generations. Stories are still being told. If you think millennials don’t appreciate the value of stories, think again. Their incessant use of cell phones and other tools of technology are sustained by stories. Yes, maybe not stories as previous generations might perceive them, but stories none the less. Instagram pictures are stories. They provide visual renditions of what’s happening in the lives of each person who shares them.

When it’s all said and done, what else does society have to drive it forward but stories? Some in society have learned how to capitalize on storytelling. They write books, produce movies and plays. What would our houses of worship have to offer their congregants without stories lifted from sacred texts. Have you ever noticed how small children develop an appreciation for storytelling early? Their parents, if they’re well engaged in their development, will often ask: what happened at school today? If the question was followed by a sincere attempt to listen, the child will usually offer salient details about the escapades of the day. They start to learn early just high powerful stories are, when told in a way that produces mind cinema.

Your stories are important. Don’t think it egotistical to think so. There are others who might find value in listening to or reading your stories. Younger family members can gain greater appreciation for where they came from by listening to your stories. Have you ever really listened to the older folks at family reunions share stories of their life’s experiences? Often the older ones, who were born before 1950, possess a certain talent for oral presentation that has been lost in subsequent generations.

I have a confession. My primary motivation for blogging is to hone my ability to tell my story. If you’re reading this, I hope you can appreciate my humble attempts at sharing my perceptions, my renditions of the world around me. Your stories are no less important than anyone’s. Find your tool, your outlet for telling your stories. Your stories could very well be the purveyor of truth and encouragement to others.

I’m old and blessed…hope you will be too.

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